Mtender Children’s Village: 10 Year Celebration Gala

In this joyous season, come celebrate the abundance of Love, Peace, Growth,

Happiness and Family God has provided to 

Mtendere Children’s Village as we happily rejoice its 10th year!

Friday, December 12, 2014

7:00 pm

The Warehouse @ Alley Station

130 Commerce Street, Montgomery AL 36104

Food, Music, Family & Friends!

$5,000 Cash Prize, Silent Auction and Raffle Items

Business or Cocktail Attire

Tickets:  $100

admits two people & one entry in cash prize drawing

*You do not need to be present to win.

Purchase

QUESTIONS?

 contact us at Gala@100XDevelopment.com or (334) 387-1152

From the Heart of Dixie to the Warm Heart of Africa

Our visits to Mtendere Village every summer spark excitement and joy in our children as they anticipate hearing from their sponsors and receiving gifts. It is like Christmas in June. We would like to thank all our children’s sponsors for investing in these young souls. We do not doubt that the children know they are loved and cared for. Although we are not able to carry all the goods in suitcases, with the help from donors, we have been blessed to send a shipping container full of supplies each year.

Sponors Thank you 1

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At the end of this month, a 40-foot shipping container filled with school and medical supplies, books, toys, tools, sports equipment, Soccer balls and jerseys, clothes, hygiene items, bed sheets blankets and mattresses will be sent to Malawi, Africa. We are still short some supplies and hope to have a few more items donated. Please join us to help in this mission.

This is how you can help:

  1. Commit to providing selected supplies on the list below
  2. Help by making a monetary donation which will allow for some goods to be purchased by 100X

If shipping to us, send to the below address:

100X Development Foundation

7020 Fain Park Drive

Montgomery, AL 36117

If dropping items off in person, packages can be delivered to:

Landmark Church of Christ

(Missions Barn)

1800 Halcyon Blvd

Montgomery, AL 36117

For further information Please contact Christina: ckadzamira@100XDevelopment.com

Things Needed at Mtendere Children’s Village

Hygiene supplies:

  • Girl’s Sanitary pads
  • Shavers
  • Deodorant
  • Tooth brushes
  • combs
  • Bathing soap bar
  • Under wear (all ages: boys & girls)
  • Socks (all sizes)
  • Bathing towels & face cloths
  • Sports bras / bras & slips

Health supplies (for house moms and children)

  • Cold medicines
  • Tylenol
  • Arthritis creams
  • Arthritis wrist and knee support bandages
  • First aid kits

House supplies (can be second hand/ used extra house hold items which are in good shape) 

  • blankets and bed sheets,
  • (hospital mattresses)
  • kitchen supplies: pots, plastic plates & cups, utensils
  • second hand furniture
  • floor mats & carpets
  • big cooking pots for the main kitchen

School supplies & items for children 

  • umbrellas/Raincoats for day scholars
  • Traveling bags, for boarding students
  • Solar power scientific calculators, composition books, rulers, pens/ pencils/ colors, any school type items for children grades 1-12J
  • Desk calendars for Mtendere teachers
  • Paint, paint brushes, canvas, wool & knitting items, beads for skills room
  • Play toys and educational toys

Tools

  • tools: Hammer, Pry bar, screw drivers
  • garden water hoes
  • Torches for security guards and houses.
  • wheel barrow
  • buckets

Clothes & shoes

  • clothes (all ages)
  • shoes (all sizes)
  • flip flops
  • any sports uniform
  • neck ties
  • belts

Big items: (we will also be taking up monetary donation if any donor would like to help purchase the following items)

  • 30 X60 Tent : used for youth rallies, community gatherings, and is an income generator for Mtendere (rented out for big functions)
  • Industrial Shelving.
  • Cafeteria chairs

Things Needed at Blessings Hospital

  • Metal receivers (kidney dishes) for minor procedures and maternity
  • Gloves both sterile and clean (in large quantity
  • Large and medium artery forceps
  • Spongy holding forceps
  • Cord clamps plastic
  • Drapes for obstetric procedures (maternity delivery) and surgery procedures
  • Sanitary Diapers  large and medium size
  • Digital measuring scale for new born babies
  • Pediatric nebulizer masks and oxygen nasal cannular
  • LAP sponges
  • Digital fetal scope
  • Scalpel blade holders
  • Pulse oximeter
  • Blood chemistry machine
  • Cbc machine
  • Desk top computers for (reception, cashier, laboratory, pharmacy, maternity, surgery center, doctor’s office.
  • Water bath with attached thermometer
  • Thermometer, room temp
  • Colored bed sheets
  • Blankets
  • Screening covers sheets for mobile clinics and wards
  • Window curtains
  • Filter papers Laboratory
  • Glass microscope slides
  • Microscope
  • Digital film processor (x-ray)
  • Lockable office cabinet drawers
  •  Formula milk i.e. F75, F100 and lactogen  1 and 2

 

 

 

 

 

Trick or treat for kids around the world

 

It is the element of surprise that makes Halloween such an enjoyable time for many children. Dressing up in fun costumes, screams and scares, running around the neighborhood on a school night and collecting candy is all about the Trick or Treating fun.

As the Halloween excitement builds all around, students of the Nonprofit Leadership Alliance from Auburn University Montgomery (AUM), organized the third annual “trick or treat” drive in their neighborhoods–a tradition started by Roselyne Bosco, now a graduate of AUM.

But, unlike the children in search of sweets, these students asked for a more nontraditional treat. Dressed up in their orange and black school colors, 10 students and two profressors took on the task of going door to door to collect hygiene items and school supplies. As this was quite an unusual ask, with permission through the neighborhood association at Sturbridge Plantation, students of the NPLA sent out flyers to every home allowing them to prepare for a different type of trick or treating to benefit children in our own community and across the globe.

This year, thanks to the effort of these students and the generosity of the community, we will be able to provide hygiene items and school supplies to children at Mtendere at Mtendere Village (Malawi) and Adullam House (Wetumpka, Alabama). We are very grateful!

Christina Kadzamira, Program Assistant

 

Dana and Katie on Faith Radio

Dana Blanchard (Director of Operations for Malawi) and Katie Sanderson (Program Director for Nursing Education) had the opportunity to speak with Bob Crittenden at Faith Radio about our education and health programs in Malawi.  Take a listen!

Dana and Katie’s Interview

Thank you, Faith Radio for leveraging your platform to help children and families in Malawi!

 

An American Nursing Student in Malawi

Katie Sanderson, recently shared about her perspective on the recent Auburn University trip to Malawi, now, we’re excited to share a student’s thoughts! 

Clinical mornings in Malawi were made up of something different each day—we never knew what to expect when we tumbled out of our bus.  The one thing we could always count on was to be greeted with smiling faces, our Kamuzu College of Nursing (KCN) partner and friends, and things we have never seen or experienced before.

Over the span of four days in clinical, there were never less than a few hundred patients waiting when we arrived on site—all eagerly waiting to receive vaccinations, treatment for sickness, and family planning assistance.  During those four days going all around Lilongwe to different villages and communities, I was exposed to more than I have ever seen.

In our clinics, we offered vaccinations for healthy babies, a clinic for children under the age of five who were sick, and family planning for women.  My favorite station to be assigned to was the under five clinic.  Mothers would come and sit with their child in their lap, and my KCN partner and I would work as a team to evaluate our patient.  She would translate for me and we would work together to arrive at a diagnosis and plan of care.

As an American nursing student, having this much autonomy was exciting and terrifying, but it was very clear at the end of each day that we had made a difference in the lives of hundreds of God’s children in Malawi.  It was very humbling to be the Lord’s hands and feet in this situation—being able to give infants and expectant mothers important vaccines to protect against tetanus and other diseases.

Our trip did not only consist of outer clinical sites, however. We were blessed to be welcomed into the homes of Mtendere Village and get to know the children and the house moms.  Momma Ruth and Momma Naomi took me in as their own child and each night we all met together with the children in their houses to have devotionals and sing together.

Being able to travel across the world and find such strong faith in a country that seems to have close to nothing was something that changed my heart and encouraged my faith in a way that I will never forget. This trip was a huge life-changing opportunity that I feel so blessed to have been a part of.

Ruthie Schaefer is a nursing student at Auburn University.

The Definition of Nursing

What is nursing?  Nursing is the protection, promotion, and optimization of health and abilities, prevention of illness and injury, alleviation of suffering through the diagnosis and treatment of human response, and advocacy in the care of individuals, families, communities, and populations.

To be a nurse, or to study to become a nurse means that an individual must encompass a desire to help others in a holistic way.  Being a nurse means caring for someone physically, emotionally, spiritually, mentally, and medicinally:  in other words, to care for the mind, body and soul.

In my most recent trip to Malawi, I was privileged to witness these definitions of nursing first hand.

Let me back up a little.  As most of you may know, after being an RN in the ICU for over three years,  I have recently transitioned into a full-time job at 100X Development where I will coordinate various nursing projects to help improve the healthcare system in Malawi.  One of the first ways that 100X moved forward in improving healthcare delivery was by developing a consortium of universities, both stateside and in Malawi.  Auburn University (my alma mater) and Kamuzu College of Nursing (KCN) in Malawi, two leaders in the development of improving the nursing standards both in the classroom and at the bedside, were among the first to join.

One of the most obvious ways to get this started was to send a group of US nursing students to Malawi to work alongside Malawian students–we knew this would stretch, mold and challenge students in a way that far outreaches ANY lesson that can be taught in a classroom.  By traveling to a developing nation where needs are overwhelming and resources are scarce, students would be pushed to the brink of communicating beyond just words, to think beyond the medicine and the machines, and treat over 100 people in a matter of a few hours.

Auburn University School of Nursing (AUSON), under the guidance of Dr. Constance Smith-Hendricks, was ready to meet this challenge head-on, and Kamuzu College of Nursing, under the leadership of Madam Address Malata, welcomed the idea of hosting a group of students that would also provide a new learning experience for her students.

So on September 7, Dr. Hendricks, Dana Blanchard, eight nursing students and I departed for what would be one of the greatest learning experiences any student could ever imagine.  Over the next 10 days, these students witnessed more need and poverty than one could think of.  They treated anywhere from 550 to 700 (hard to keep track of the exact number due to the large crowds) women, children and babies.  Their skills, knowledge and perseverance was challenged as the crowds lined up to wait for hours to see an American nurse, and yet they responded with professionalism and grace.

The AUSON students also experienced the challenges of being a college student in a developing nation by being partnered with a nursing student from KCN. The relationships formed between these student pairs was just another positive outcome in one of the most successful and educational trips that 100X has ever taken part in.  As the days of the trip continued to pass by, the students were able to experience clinical settings ranging from home-based care out in straw-roofed huts, to rural clinics in the middle of villages, a health care center, and even some time in a labor and delivery ward.

The eight student nurses who travelled to Malawi with me were truly impressive young ladies.  While their eyes were opened to an entire new setting of healthcare and a totally new definition of “need”, it was their souls that were touched by the people of Malawi.  They will without a doubt be some of the best-prepared nursing graduates, but even more so, they will be part of forever changing the health care system in a country that so desperately needs a positive change.

Nursing care comes in many forms.  Sometimes it is the ability to make someone feel physically comfortable by various means.  Other times it is the ability to improve the body’s ability to achieve or maintain health.  But often it is an uncanny yet well honed knack to see beyond the obvious and address, in some way, the deeper needs of the human soul. 

~Donna Wilk Cardillo, A Daybook for Beginning Nurses

Katie Sanderson, Program Director for Nursing Education


Buy a shirt = Feed & Educate Orphans in Malawi

Hot off the press!  We’ve received such great feedback on our new t-shirts, and we’re so excited about what we’ll be able to do with the proceeds.  All of the funds generated will go to our nutrition and education programs in Malawi.  Questions?  Email Info@100XDevelopment.com.

Buy a shirt = Feed & Educate Orphans and Vulnerable Children in Malawi.

Buy Now

 

 

LEVERAGE: Beauty of Life

As I sit here back at home, all I can think about are my adventures back in Malawi. How truly blessed I am to not only have gone once, but twice. Traveling to Malawi has allowed me to discover the beauty of life. It reminds me that I am not complete without these beautiful people who live half way across the globe. There is nothing like sitting on the porch of the guesthouse, overlooking Mtendere Village, and just spending time with all the wonderful kids. Even the amazing photos I have of the kids do not do them justice. Their beauty is something I have experienced first hand and it is these moments that will stay with me through the rest of my life.

While at Mtendere I had the opportunity to do some tutoring, help out in the preschool, and help out anywhere else it was needed. There were always opportunities to help out. Working in the preschool room was such a joy! I am amazed by how much the preschoolers know! It brought me great joy to watch Lovemore, the preschool teacher, share in his students’ successes. As a first grade teacher, having the opportunity to work with these children one on one is amazing. I had the chance to tutor a lot of the students in standard one, which is comparable to first grade. I have never seen such passion and excitement to learn. When we provided manipulatives and hands on learning materials the students’ eyes lit up. I love seeing such excitement to learn. The students are so resourceful and I know they will continue to work hard on their studies.


Traveling to Malawi has changed me forever. It has shown me to truly care for issues that are bigger than myself. In life, I think everyone has a special issue close to their heart, and I have found mine; those kids who have been left alone in this world. Mtendere Village is a place for some of these children and if you spend even a day there you can see how much love can do for a child. As my professor, Dr. Tony Kline said, “It’s amazing what a year of love can do.” This quote has stuck with me since this trip and I realize how truly profound love can be.  During my trip I witnessed this first hand.  A beautiful, 10 day old girl, named Winnie was given a chance at life in Mtendere Village. She was brought home, and immediately surrounded by family. It was a miracle, a chance for a child to grow up in a world where she is cared for. While there, I also got the chance to meet and spend time with the girl I sponsor, Eneles. At the beginning she was very shy and timid, but as time went on she opened up to us. I cannot even begin to describe her true beauty and joy. She has this smile and laugh that are just contagious. I am so proud of her and can’t wait to watch her grow as a person.

The world is a beautiful place, full of works of art. Throughout my entire trip, I experienced these first hand. Mtendere Village is a piece of this. There is nothing like walking the kids to school on the dusty African paths. Watching kids study and work so hard. Teaching the kids new things. Staring off at the mountains in horizon. Swinging at night and gazing at the stars. Laughing and being a kid. Hugging kids every single day.  Singing and praising God, who has given us this wonderful life. Seeing the smiling faces of kids who have gotten a second chance at life. This is my life, my chance at getting to know the world and some of the magnificent people that fill it. I can’t wait to go back again.

Maura Sawicki graduated from Ball State University in 2011 and is in her second year teaching 1st grade.

LEVERAGE: The Warm Heart of Africa

The Warm Heart of Africa

by Blair Brendle 

The “Warm Heart of Africa” is this country’s nickname

The beauty in the faces has given it its fame

A place of peace, jokes, and constant smiles

A place of strength, endurance, and perseverance for the miles

But most importantly to me, this country holds a special place

A village full of children that could have easily been erased

Because though this country is beautiful, it is struggling all the same

Not enough food, too much disease, poor education, a cyclic game

But this one special village is trying to make a break

To the cycle of helplessness, loss, hunger, disease, and mistake

This village has a dream to empower and equip

The next generation to get out from under injustice’s grip

This dream is big and lofty, of course this much is true

But one day at a time, they’re doing all that they can do

Within this village resides almost 200 of its nation’s best

Whose pasts are full of darkness, but whose futures can be blessed

This village’s name means peace; in Chichewa it’s called Mtendere

But it’s more than just tranquility or resting for the weary

It’s a place where within the peace, true restoration occurs

Where what was, is replaced with what can be; where true redemption stirs

Where acceptance, adoption, and forgiveness are part of each day

Where The Truth and The Life are ever exposing The Way

It’s a tiny little village in stark contrast to a great big earth

But to all who step foot on it, it grants a chance for new birth

It’s a slice of kingdom on this side of glory

And I’m so thankful that for three weeks I got to be a part of its story

Blair spent three weeks at our orphan care program in Malawi this summer.  She drafted this poem shortly after her return.  We are always very excited to see people leveraging their talents for good!