Beyond Sunday…

Everything we believe in hinges on Sunday. If Jesus never walked out of that tomb then Friday would have been the end of a mediocre story. If Jesus was just a nice man who died on a cross, then His name would have been forgotten. But Sunday did happen, and He did walk out. In that single day over 2,000 years ago that nice man declared His Lordship by conquering death itself.

But what about Monday? What about the days when the glory of Sunday seems like a faint memory overwhelmed by the struggles of the present day?Through our work, we sometimes see the worst of those struggles. There a days when poverty and hunger, death, brokenness, pain and need, seem too big.

But if Sunday really happened then we have a resurrected King sitting on the throne of Heaven. His sovereignty is why we do what we do. He is alive and because He lives we will not stop.

Monday may seem unbearable but we will declare every Monday morning that King Jesus is alive and He has overcome the world!

 

Fuel

One of the fun things I enjoy is asking children what they want to be when they grow up. A couple of the children at Mtendere want to grow up to be a doctor, a president, a police officer, or a teacher. However, their ambition does not end in the career title alone, but in the fact that they want to be a force for justice and vessels to help bring hope in the lives of others. Fast forward a few years later, I see the joy in other children like Rosemary, who have grown up at Mtendere but are now graduating and impacting the lives of other young girls.

I remember at a young age when I wanted to become a ‘World Changer.’ I wanted to be a mover and shaker and help bring positive impact to my community. However, as I grew, I realized that the fuel to my actions was the lifeline that would determine how far I go. Sometimes we are driven by our passion and good intentions, and other times we can be driven by our frustrations and anger. The world is broken, and creation is groaning under the curse of sin. We come from broken places, and sometimes the million shattered pieces of glass cannot be put back together with the single tube of glue we have.

When we allow God to come in and fuel our actions, we give Him permission to find and pick up all the broken pieces; we allow Him to heal and create something new and beautiful for us. We cannot leave GOD out of this equation. Sometimes change is a hard and painful process. Similar to a wound, it first bleeds, then the inflammation starts, and slowly the formation of new tissue and binding of new cells brings complete healing. Although we wear the visible scars, we live out the beautiful story of healing and love. As we seek for a change in our communities and the world, and as we work with lives that are broken and oppressed; my prayer is that GOD fuels your drive and passion so that you never run on empty.

“All change comes from deepening your understanding of the salvation of Christ and living out the changes that understanding creates in your heart.”

― Timothy J. Keller

Happy New Year

Happy New Year Family!

We love you! The gifts you have given, the time you’ve spent in prayer and service, and the commitments you’ve followed through with this past year have brought so much of God’s love and freedom to our children. We are in awe as we look back and see what the Lord has done in 2017 and we look forward, with even greater expectation, to seeing what He has in mind for 2018. We know that the seeds you have sown in this past year will reap an even greater harvest and that God will be glorified through your love and obedience!

As we look forward to 2018, we ask you to pray for clear direction from the Lord about what he has for us in this upcoming year and that he would enable and empower us by his Spirit to continue to care for the lost and the broken children of the world. As we rest in his power and in his will, we trust that he will continue to do immeasurably more than we could ever ask or imagine, all for the glory of his Son, Jesus.

in His service

Christina Kadzamira Govati

 

 

 

Guest Blog: A Birthday

We are throwing it back this Thursday with a story from one of  our volunteer teachers who worked at Mtendere last summer. Our Guest blogger is McCarley Jane Thomas from Nashville Tennessee. McCarley works at Nolensville High School

Day 3: Our first day to work with the teachers. We had visited most of the classrooms and met the teachers briefly on the first day, but we had not had the chance to sit down and get to know them yet.

3 o’clock came around, and one by one the teachers made their way into the classroom. We spread ourselves amongst the teachers, and began a short icebreaker.

The premise of the icebreaker was simple. A list of questions were hung on the bored. Each person answered the questions about him or herself to their partner. The partner would then have the responsibility of presenting their new friend to the rest of the group.

I wound up sitting by a high school Math teacher named Douglas. Let me tell you some things I learned about Douglas. I learned he has been teaching for 15 years, his favorite food is chicken with rice, and he has two daughters. Douglas also told me that he teaches because of the connections the profession allows him to make with his students.

After a good amount of time, we started to come back together to share with the rest of the teachers in the room. Before we left, Douglas grabbed my hand and asked me when my birthday is. I smiled and said, “July, 9th. When is yours?” His is May 5th. I made a silly comment about Cinco De Mayo before realizing the people of Malawi have no idea what that means.

We came back together and shared about our partners before continuing with our first day of training.

Fast forward with me to our second to last day of training with the teachers. I found myself sitting at a table with Douglas. It was the first time we had been at a table together since that first day of training.

We were doing an exercise that required a leader for the table. We determined who the leader was by everyone sharing their birthdays, and whoever’s was closest got to be the leader. One by one we went around the table sharing our birthdays. I was last.

I opened my mouth, but before I could say anything I heard Douglas. “Mac. July 9th!” I looked at him with a similar look to the one I gave the boy with the corn cobs earlier in the trip. I smiled and said, “Douglas, you remembered.” He smiled back, “Of course I did, Mac! You are my friend.”

I was floored. It had been nearly ten days since we had talked about the small details of our lives, and he had specifically asked me about my birthday. But he remembered, and that meant more to me than he will ever know.

I learned two very important lessons from Douglas that day: the importance of being thoughtful and intentional and the incredible impact those two things can have on the people around you.

I miss my friend Douglas along with so many others from Malawi, and I think about them often. This week I celebrated my 22nd birthday. I can’t help but think that as Saturday, July 9th rolled around, somewhere in a home in Malawi a high school Math teacher smiled to himself as he remembered his new, tall, English teaching, American friend. I know one thing for sure: when May 5th comes back around, I will be doing the same thing.

God Bless,

McCarley

Mtendere Stories: Tea Time

Some of my favorite memories involve gathering at the table for 4’oclock Tea Time.There is something special about the soothing taste of honey lemon Chombe tea and the delicious fresh baked bread bought from the local bakery; but mostly, the best part of Tea Time is the company that joins at the table, or on the porch, or under a tree to share stories and laughter.
 
At Mtendere, there are 16 house mothers, and I am almost always tempted to plan my visits to each house mid afternoon so I can slip in just in time for Tea Time. Mama Ruth usually has a bowl of popcorn kept away to treat the kids as they trickle in from afternoon classes. Occasionally, Mama Kita has her little mbaula-stove smoking away as she boils some milk to make some creamy sweet tea. As you approach Mama Alice’s house, you could smell the savory aroma of roasted sweet potatoes and right next-door Mama Loveness will be tenderly fixing some slices of bread for her little ones. Across the campus, you could hear Mama Naomi ardently calling in her older boys as she fixes them a treat she had hidden away all day. You can find Mama Eunice showing off her amazing baking skills as she bakes her yeast scones outside in the sun while little gleaming eyes and watery mouths eagerly linger around her. Bless Mama Loyce; her Tea Time is very unpredictable. Mama Loyce has a handful of little energetic boys, and almost without fail, she will be trying to straighten them out while hollering at them to wash their grubby little hands and feet before they enter the house.
 
During this whole time, as school breaks off and the children walk back home or play on the grounds, laughter and joy fills the air. There is an open invitation in each house to sit down together, to discuss and digest the day while we commune together and happily fill our bellies.
 
Tea Time fills my soul; it slows me down, reconnects me to the heart matters, and reminds me how special and unique each person at Mtendere is.
By Christina Govati