Natalie’s Story

Natalie“In my country, girls like me disappear into the sex trade and their story ends very differently.  I know Stella’s Voice and 100X saved my life.”

I grew up in the largest orphanage in Moldova.  When I was four, my mom became blind in an accident.  My grandmother looked after me for a while, but it was hard because she didn’t have a job.  When I was seven, she put me in the orphanage.  

Being in the orphanage was not fun.  I had no one.  No one ever told me that I was loved.  I had no hope, and wanted to give up on life.

At 16, we “graduate” and are kicked out of the orphanage.  When I turned 16, I would cry myself to sleep.  The orphanage wasn’t great, but it was all I had.  I was told about the risk of human trafficking, but without a place to go, I didn’t know how to avoid this risk.  I didn’t know who to ask for help.

A few days before I was put out, I was told about Stella’s House. I didn’t believe something like this existed for me—an orphan.  I couldn’t believe that I would be able to continue my studies and be a normal kid.  Stella’s House and 100X taught me about Christ by showing that they care for kids like me—they gave me a future when I didn’t have any hope and the family I’ve always wanted!  In my country, girls like me disappear into the sex trade and their story ends very differently.  I know Stella’s Voice and 100X saved my life.

You can help us reach more at-risk girls like Natalie.  Find out more.

*100X has partnered with Stella’s Voice in Moldova since 2006.

You’re Invited! Join us for the 100X Winter Gala.

An evening to celebrate the work of 100X and help children and families across the globe achieve a more hopeful future.

Thursday, December 13, 2012 | 7:00pm

Renaissance Montgomery Hotel & Spa | Alabama Ballroom 201 Tallapoosa Street | Montgomery, Alabama

Live Performance by Accent

as well as a $10K Cash Prize and Silent Auction

Business or Cocktail Attire

TICKETS | $100

Includes two gala tickets & one entry in cash prize drawing.*  Tickets are on sale now.

TEAM LEVERAGE

Purchase your own ticket and commit to recruit 5 friends. Team members will receive special recognition in program materials!

SPONSORSHIP

There are a variety of sponsorship levels available—ranging from in-kind donations for the silent auction to financial contributions of $10,000, $2,500, and $1,000.

QUESTIONS?

Visit our Gala page or contact our team at Gala@100XDevelopment.com or (334) 387-1170.

*You do not need to be present to win.

Trick or treat for kids around the world

 

It is the element of surprise that makes Halloween such an enjoyable time for many children. Dressing up in fun costumes, screams and scares, running around the neighborhood on a school night and collecting candy is all about the Trick or Treating fun.

As the Halloween excitement builds all around, students of the Nonprofit Leadership Alliance from Auburn University Montgomery (AUM), organized the third annual “trick or treat” drive in their neighborhoods–a tradition started by Roselyne Bosco, now a graduate of AUM.

But, unlike the children in search of sweets, these students asked for a more nontraditional treat. Dressed up in their orange and black school colors, 10 students and two profressors took on the task of going door to door to collect hygiene items and school supplies. As this was quite an unusual ask, with permission through the neighborhood association at Sturbridge Plantation, students of the NPLA sent out flyers to every home allowing them to prepare for a different type of trick or treating to benefit children in our own community and across the globe.

This year, thanks to the effort of these students and the generosity of the community, we will be able to provide hygiene items and school supplies to children at Mtendere at Mtendere Village (Malawi) and Adullam House (Wetumpka, Alabama). We are very grateful!

Christina Kadzamira, Program Assistant

 

100X is invited to Participate in Anti-Slavery Day in the UK

Pictured L to R: Philip Cameron (Stella’s Voice), Mr. Anthony Steen (Chairman of the Human Trafficking Foundation), Rt Hon John Bercow (Speaker of the House of Commons), Mr. Peter Bone (Member of Parliament; Chairman of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Human Trafficking), Lindy Blanchard, and John Blanchard.

In 1833, the British Parliament abolished slavery in (most of) the British Empire via the Slavery Abolition Act.  Thirty-two years later, the 13th Amendment outlawed slavery and involuntary servitude in the United States.  According to our laws, both countries do not sanction slavery. We thought slavery was abolished in the 19th century, yet today there are tens of thousands of people enslaved in these two countries alone.

Frederick Douglas, a former slave and abolitionist said, “They would not call it slavery, but some other name. Slavery has been fruitful in giving herself names … and it will call itself by yet another name; and you and I and all of us had better wait and see what new form this old monster will assume, in what new skin this old snake will come forth.” He was right. Today we call it “human trafficking,” and once again, we must expose this practice and declare it unacceptable.

We are grateful that there are leaders in both the US and the United Kingdom that are working to protect victims and prevent children from being traded as commodities, and last week, we were privileged to stand beside some of them.

Just this past week, by invitation from the Speaker of the House of Commons, the Right Honorable John Bercow and Mr. Peter Bone, a Member of Parliament and Chairman of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Human Trafficking, 100X Founders John and Lindy Blanchard traveled to the UK to mark Anti-Slavery Day.  Over the course of two days, they attended the Parliamentarians Against Human Trafficking Conference and met with leaders from Parliament and the Council of Europe to discuss how we can leverage our resources and work together to end human trafficking across the globe.  It is evident that these leaders are committed to this fight, and we are honored to stand with them with great expectation of what is to come.

WHAT WE’RE DOING TO PROTECT CHILDREN FROM HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Human trafficking is the second largest global organized crime today—generating $31.6 billion annually.  Each year more than 1.5 million children are trafficked for commercial sexual exploitation and forced labor, and it is estimated that 99% are never rescued.  The innocence of childhood is exchanged for the profit of others.  This is a crime that knows no boundaries—whether geographic, ethnic, or socio-economic—but the most vulnerable are those who have no one to speak for them.  On five continents, we are working on the front lines to prevent children from falling victim to this horrific crime.

Protection and Empowerment. To date, we have partnered with nonprofits across the globe to build 31 houses for orphans and vulnerable children, and in 2011, more than 500 children were reached. Each of our programs provides a safe and loving home environment where children are able to complete their education and learn life skills that will provide the foundation for a hopeful and productive future.  Our work protects the most vulnerable children by providing access to caring adults, educational support, health care and job training.

We recognize that entrapment in human trafficking is often the result of poverty and lack of resources, so we have also established a consortium of university partners who are working with us to develop education and workforce development programs, as well as opportunities for continued education at the university level.

Education and Mobilization.  In a speech before the House of Commons in 1791, William Wilberforce stated, “You may choose to look the other way but you can never again say you did not know.” We are committed to exposing the evil of human trafficking, and providing resources for those who choose not to look away. The criminal network working to ensure the continuation of this exploitation is strong, and complete abolition will require engagement at all levels—from students to heads of State.

5 WAYS YOU CAN HELP END HUMAN TRAFFICKING

An American Nursing Student in Malawi

Katie Sanderson, recently shared about her perspective on the recent Auburn University trip to Malawi, now, we’re excited to share a student’s thoughts! 

Clinical mornings in Malawi were made up of something different each day—we never knew what to expect when we tumbled out of our bus.  The one thing we could always count on was to be greeted with smiling faces, our Kamuzu College of Nursing (KCN) partner and friends, and things we have never seen or experienced before.

Over the span of four days in clinical, there were never less than a few hundred patients waiting when we arrived on site—all eagerly waiting to receive vaccinations, treatment for sickness, and family planning assistance.  During those four days going all around Lilongwe to different villages and communities, I was exposed to more than I have ever seen.

In our clinics, we offered vaccinations for healthy babies, a clinic for children under the age of five who were sick, and family planning for women.  My favorite station to be assigned to was the under five clinic.  Mothers would come and sit with their child in their lap, and my KCN partner and I would work as a team to evaluate our patient.  She would translate for me and we would work together to arrive at a diagnosis and plan of care.

As an American nursing student, having this much autonomy was exciting and terrifying, but it was very clear at the end of each day that we had made a difference in the lives of hundreds of God’s children in Malawi.  It was very humbling to be the Lord’s hands and feet in this situation—being able to give infants and expectant mothers important vaccines to protect against tetanus and other diseases.

Our trip did not only consist of outer clinical sites, however. We were blessed to be welcomed into the homes of Mtendere Village and get to know the children and the house moms.  Momma Ruth and Momma Naomi took me in as their own child and each night we all met together with the children in their houses to have devotionals and sing together.

Being able to travel across the world and find such strong faith in a country that seems to have close to nothing was something that changed my heart and encouraged my faith in a way that I will never forget. This trip was a huge life-changing opportunity that I feel so blessed to have been a part of.

Ruthie Schaefer is a nursing student at Auburn University.

LEVERAGE: 5 Ways You Can Help End Human Trafficking

LEVERAGE…

Your voice. 

Posts and tweets.  Social media is the modern day equivalent to a soapbox in the town square.  Whether you are using Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, or something else, you have a platform to share about what human trafficking is and what we can do to stop it.

Conversations.  “Evil flourishes in the darkness, and the only remedy is to expose and fight against it.” (John Blanchard)  By sharing with your family, friends and colleagues, you can play a part in exposing human trafficking for the evil that it is. Get involved!  Do what you can to educate yourself and others about this modern day exploitation of innocent victims. 

To Lawmakers.  Support from local and national lawmakers is critical to ending human trafficking, and your voice impacts their decisions.  Just last month, the White House announced new efforts to end human trafficking—and it was the voice of advocates that brought this issue to the forefront.  Write a letter; call your representatives.  Let them know that you care about ending this violent exploitation.  If you are in the US, request that your representative on Capitol Hill support the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act (TVPRA).

Your talents.

How can you give?  The possibilities are endless.  Advocates around the globe are using their talents as songwriters, photographers & videographers, doctors, bakers, writers, painters, graphic design artists, teachers, and encouragers to make a difference.  In your own special way, you can use what is already in your hands to influence great change.

Your finances.

Human trafficking is a well organized, $32 billion industry, and fighting against that takes resources.  Your financial support directly impacts our ability to protect more children against exploitation.

Your time.

Educate yourself.  There are many ways that you can educate yourself about human trafficking – books, movies, websites, and even Facebook and Twitter. Here are a few to help you get started.

100X & Human Trafficking.  What We are Doing and Blog Updates

BooksGirls Like Us by Rachel Lloyd, Half the Sky by Nick Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn, and A Crime So Monstrous by Benjamin Skinner

Movies. Nefarious: Merchant of Souls, Human Trafficking and Trade

WebsitesPolaris Project Resource CenterUN Global Initiative to Fight Human Trafficking, and State Department Office to Monitor & Combat Trafficking in Persons

Host an event; start a fundraising campaign.  Movie night, book club, 5Ks and sports tournaments, concerts and birthday parties.  Gather some friends and be creative!  If you’re interested in fundraising, we’ve made it easy.  You can develop a campaign page at Razoo, and start sharing with your friends in minutes.

Your prayers.

We very much believe there is an enemy that does not want human trafficking to end, but each one of us has at our disposal the most powerful weapon of warfare—and that is prayer.  Please, pray for the girls, for those working to help them, and for exposure of those who are exploiting them.  Your prayers are critical to pushing back against the darkness.

If you or someone you know is a victim of human trafficking, call the National Human Trafficking Hotline at 1-888-3737-888.  It is free and confidential (24/7).

If you have any questions, send an email to LEVERAGE@100XDevelopment.com, and our team will be happy to provide information or talk through any ideas you may have!

A few of our favorite things…and other random facts about our team.

A few of my favorite things…

Chocolate. My dogs. My red couch. Sunsets. The smell of dryer sheets. –Dana

Books. Greek Yogurt. A long conversation over a steaming cup of chai  (generally at Starbucks). That moment when the wheels of a plane first lift off the ground. Advocating for women and children. –Kimberly

Chocolate. The beach. Making a difference. Family. Bella (my dog). –Terri

Chockit cookies. Grey’s Anatomy. Autumn. Traveling. Fun family gatherings. –Christina

Reading. Traveling. Playing with Millie and Lucy (my dogs). Sports (particularly basketball, volleyball, and AU football). Swimming. –Katie

What story does your family always tell about you?

The one where days after I graduated from high school I flew (for the first time) to Alaska to work in a fish cannery in order to pay for college.  Of course, that happened to be the summer the fishermen decided to go on strike on our tiny Island, Uganik Bay, and only those who woke up really early were given work. I spent the summer waking up far too early to do whatever was available that day…painting the landing dock (aka airport), driving a pallet jack, etc. –Dana

When I was around 2-3 years old, my mom walked into the kitchen and found me on top of the refrigerator.  Initially, she thought that my dad had put me there as a practical joke (which she didn’t think was very funny), but quickly realized that I stood on the back of a chair, crawled into the freezer, and then pulled myself up to the top.  This, after my dad had informed me a few days before that he’d put my doll on top of the refrigerator if I didn’t behave.  I decided to do a test rescue mission.  Let’s just say that “The Strong-Willed Child” by James Dobson became one of my parents’ most referenced books. –Kimberly

About the time I ran away from summer camp with a chicken…. –Terri [note: We ALL want to hear more details on this…]

How I hated eating and found many ways to dispose of my food secretly.  You see, I thought I was smart about it, but I got caught half the time trying to shove food in my brother’s plate or simply wasting half of my meal under the table.  It took me two hours to finish my meals, and I have many childhood pictures left alone at the dining room table.  The thought shocks me now because I sure love food and my veggies!! –Christina

One time, I spent the night away with a friend.  I was in the first or second grade.  When she was busy, I snuck downstairs to use the phone to call my mom and ask “if she could bring my blanket?”  She didn’t answer, so I left it on an answering machine in a very hushed, secret voice. For some odd reason, my parents LOVE to tell this story. –Katie

If you could choose anyone, whom would you pick as your mentor?

Mother Teresa. –Dana

Christine Caine.  I love her passion for mobilizing the church to do what we are called to do, and am rarely left unchallenged by what she has to say.  She also loves Starbucks, perhaps even more than I do, so really, who could ask for more. –Kimberly

Jesus first…then Margaret Thatcher. –Terri

Anne Ledet (a member of my Church).  I have known her for 5 years and absolutely adore her. –Christina

Good question, but I feel like I have a pretty good one in my mom. –Katie

If you could learn to do anything, what would it be?

Sing and play an instrument. –Dana

To speak French and Italian. –Kimberly

Scuba diving. –Terri

Speak three other languages, and I would love to learn how to play the guitar. –Christina [note: We thought you should know, Christina speaks Chichewa and English, and has a good understanding of French, as well as ancient and classic Latin.]

Heart surgery. –Katie

If you could meet anyone, living or dead, who would you choose?

Oprah. –Dana

It is a toss up between Eleanor Roosevelt and Harriet Beecher Stowe – both women used what was in their hand to catalyze change in their generation.  I love that. –Kimberly

Corrie Ten Boom. –Terri

Oprah Winfrey and/or Nelson Mandela. –Christina

Mother Theresa or Florence Nightingale. –Katie

When you have an hour of free time, how do you pass the time?

I read. –Dana & Terri

I love to find a comfy chair (either at home or a coffee shop), and dig in to a good book.  I almost never leave home without a book, pen and highlighter—just in case the opportunity presents itself. –Kimberly

Take a good ol nap! –Christina

Reading or sleeping. –Katie

What was the last book you read?

Pay it Forward by Catherine Ryan Hyde & Have a New Teen by Friday by Dr. Kevin Leman. –Dana

The Harbinger by Jonathon Cahn. –Terri

I Am Nujood, Age 10 and Divorced by Nujood Ali. –Kimberly

The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba.  It is a very good book – it took me back to childhood, and really provides a good understanding of typical life in Malawi for a lot of kids. –Christina

ZOO by James Patterson. –Katie

What is one of your favorite scripture verses?      

You’re here to be light, bringing out the God-colors in the world.  God is not a secret to be kept.  We’re going public with this, as public as a city on a hill.  If I make you light-bearers, you don’t think I’m going to hide you under a bucket, do you?  I’m putting you on a light stand.  Now that I’ve put you there on a hilltop, on a light stand—shine!  Keep open house; be generous with your lives.  By opening up to others, you’ll prompt people to open up with God, this generous Father in heaven.  (Matthew 5:14-16) –Dana

The one who says he abides in Him ought himself to walk in the same manner as He walked.  (1 John 2:6) –Kimberly

Yet those who wait for the Lord will gain new strength; they will mount up with wings like eagles, they will run and not get tired, they will walk and not become weary. (Isaiah 40:31) –Terri

It is of the Lord’s mercies that we are not consumed, because his compassions fail not.  They are new every morning: great is thy faithfulness.  (Lamentations 3:22-23) –Christina

And not only this, but we also exult in our tribulations, knowing that tribulation brings about perseverance; and perseverance, proven character; and proven character, hope; and hope does not disappoint, because the love of God has been poured out within our hearts through the Holy Spirit who was given to us.  (Romans 5:3-5)  –Katie

What’s the most played song on your iPod?

O Praise Him (All This For A King) by David Crowder. –Dana

It is a tie – Hands and Feet by Audio Adrenaline and Indescribable by Chris Tomlin. –Kimberly

Above All by Michael W. Smith. –Terri

I have two – Lengoma by Zahara and Beautiful by Phil Wickham. –Christina

10,000 Reasons (Bless the Lord) by Matt Redman. –Katie

The 100X Team

P.S. We’d love to hear your response to these questions…leave a comment here or join the conversation on Facebook or Twitter!